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Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou of China granted $10 million bail by Canada judge, awaits US extradition hearing

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A judge in Canada today granted $10 million bail for Meng Wanzhou, the CFO of China electronics giant Huawei. She has to remain in the Vancouver area, where she has a home. The United States has requested her extradition. China is not happy. Huawai's response follows.

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BBC:

Meng Wanzhou could be extradited to the US to face fraud charges linked to the alleged violation of sanctions on Iran.

A judge in Vancouver set her bail at C$10m (£6m; $7.4m) including C$7m in cash.

Meng was arrested in Vancouver on 1 December. Her detention has angered China and threatened to worsen its trade war with the US.

Here is Huawei's official statement on her release, which came out around 6pm ET Tuesday.

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mxm23
1 day ago
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And China arrested a Canadian diplomat on Monday.
San Rafael, CA
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An unfortunate hole in my portable brain

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This morning I got an email from one of my business partners. She’s out of town on a job and needed our FedEx number sent to another lab so they can ship some samples to us. No problem, I thought, I’m sure I have it on my phone. But no, that was one of those things I always meant to save on my phone but never got around to. My partner thought she had it on her phone, too.

Here are the things I have gotten around to saving to my phone:1

  • Social security numbers for myself (which is kind of silly—I never need to look it up) and my family. This includes my mother and father, both of whom are now dead.
  • Driver’s license numbers for myself and my family. Also photos of the front and back of my license.
  • Make, model, year, license, and registration numbers for our cars. Also images of the registration documents.
  • Bank account, routing, and other numbers and codes for personal and business accounts.
  • FEINs for businesses.
  • My TSA Precheck code.
  • The number, expiration date, and a photo of my passport.

Some of these may seem silly, but I’ve made use of almost all of them at one time or another. A couple of years ago, when my mom moved to a nursing home and I needed to close out certain services at her house, I learned that the phone service was still in my dad’s name. She’d never changed it when he died ten years earlier. So I used his SSN (along with my grandmother’s maiden name, which wasn’t saved to my phone but didn’t need to be) to impersonate him with the phone company and get the account closed. That was a little weird.

(I have since learned that friends my age commonly pretend to be their aging parents to deal with customer service reps. I am, however, the only one I know who pretended to be a dead parent.)

As I look through the list, I see that I still haven’t added things I’ve always meant to. In particular, apart from the FedEx number, I should be keeping the account numbers for various insurance policies.

Up until recently, I’ve had (or intended to have) all of this stuff in secure notes in 1Password. As part of my shift to a more iCloud-based system, I’ve copied them over to locked notes in the Notes app. There have been advantages and disadvantages to the change.

  • Secure notes in iOS 1Password won’t accept images. When I wanted to add a photo to a secure note, I had to be at my Mac to do so. Given that all the photos I wanted to add—typically cards or documents scanned with Readdle’s Scanner Pro—came from my phone, this was annoying bit of back-and-forth. On the positive side, once the image was in the secure note, I could see it on my phone or iPad.
  • Unlocking Notes on iOS can can have its own back-and-forth annoyance. Sometimes the app is perfectly happy to unlock after looking at my face or scanning my fingerprint. But sometimes, it wants me to enter the iCloud Keychain password I’ve associated with Notes. Which means I have to unlock the Keychain and select the password to fill into the text field. Often, the just-unlocked note still won’t show itself to me until I go back to the list of notes and select it again. I’m sure there’s some logic behind this, but I have no idea what it is.

  1. And iPad and Macs, but it’s mostly when I’m out with just my phone that I need them. 


[If the formatting looks odd in your feed reader, visit the original article]

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mxm23
1 day ago
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I save all this sort of stuff in 1Password. I won’t / can’t move to iCloud notes because I work on Windows. (I guess iCloud web site might work?) 1Password works well and actually has built-in concepts for drivers licenses, social security numbers and passports.

I suppose a consideration is how much I trust 1Password security versus Apple security.
San Rafael, CA
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California’s 2018 Wildfires Should Be a Turning Point on Climate Change

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Mat Honan, writing at BuzzFeed:

2018 is the year when everyone, everyone, in the state ran from the fires or choked on the fumes. It is a before-and-after moment. In California, in mid-November of 2018, it became as clear as it did in New York in mid-September of 2001 that what was a once-distant threat has now arrived.

Climate change denialists — and this the entire Republican party — have blood on their hands.

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mxm23
15 days ago
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I recently attended a small conference on climate change. The major message (new for me) is that the focus on mitigation, while still important, should now take second place to adaptation. That is, it's mostly too late to stem the worst of climate change. Now we must learn to adapt to the new reality over time. Sobering.
San Rafael, CA
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2 public comments
jkevmoses
17 days ago
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So do the sham artists that sold the Paris Agreement as something that would help. Empty promises from countries that have no desire to actually do anything are worthless. Just gives people false hope that somewhere governments are doing something when none actually are.
McKinney, Texas
tingham
17 days ago
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Every one of us has this blood on our hands John. It's not just "them."
Cary, NC

Adult Nonfiction Adapted for Younger Readers

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Younger Readers

Lately I’ve been noticing that more and more authors seem to be adapting their adult nonfiction books for younger readers (typically for the middle grade set, ages 8-12). The young readers editions are shorter and often contain more illustrations, photos, graphs, and charts than their adult counterparts, distilling the story and information down into what would be in the movie versions of these books. Here are some of the young readers’ editions I’ve run across.

The Omnivore’s Dilemma: Young Readers Edition by Michael Pollan. “This young readers’ adaptation of Pollan’s famous food-chain exploration encourages kids to consider the personal and global health implications of their food choices.”

A Young People’s History of the United States: Columbus to the War on Terror by Howard Zinn (adapted by Rebecca Stefoff). “Zinn in the volumes of A Young People’s History of the United States presents a radical new way of understanding America’s history. In so doing, he reminds readers that America’s true greatness is shaped by our dissident voices, not our military generals.”

Notorious RBG Young Readers’ Edition: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg by Irin Carmon & Shana Knizhnik, “mixes pop culture, humor, and expert analysis for a remarkable account of the indomitable Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Heroine. Trailblazer. Pioneer.”

Before Columbus: The Americas of 1491 by Charles Mann. “A companion book for young readers based on 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus, the groundbreaking bestseller by Charles C. Mann.” See also Mann’s 1493 for Young People: From Columbus’s Voyage to Globalization.

Hidden Figures Young Readers’ Edition by Margot Lee Shetterly, “the powerful story of four African-American female mathematicians at NASA who helped achieve some of the greatest moments in our space program”.

On the Origin of Species: Young Readers Edition by Charles Darwin (adapted by Rebecca Stefoff). “Meticulously curated to honor Darwin’s original text, this compelling edition also provides contemporary insight, photographs, illustrations, and more.” (Having tried to read the original text once, I might recommend this version for everyone who isn’t a biologist.)

Code Girls: The True Story of the American Women Who Secretly Broke Codes in World War II (Young Readers Edition) by Liza Mundy. “Due to the top secret nature of their accomplishments, these women have never been able to talk about their story — until now.”

I Am Malala: How One Girl Stood Up for Education and Changed the World by Malala Yousafzai. “In this Young Readers Edition of her bestselling memoir, which has been reimagined specifically for a younger audience and includes exclusive photos and material, we hear firsthand the remarkable story of a girl who knew from a young age that she wanted to change the world — and did.”

Unbroken (The Young Adult Adaptation): An Olympian’s Journey from Airman to Castaway to Captive by Laura Hillenbrand. “Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would respond to desperation with ingenuity, suffering with hope and humor, brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would hang on the fraying wire of his will.”

How We Got To Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson. “This adaptation of his adult book and popular PBS series explores the fascinating and interconnected stories of innovations — like clean drinking water and electricity — that changed the way people live.”

Tags: books   lists
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mxm23
22 days ago
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Maybe it’s the internet that has shortened my attention span but I wish there were more books like this. I don’t need to know all the details (I’m looking at you, Michale Pollan.) I just want the interesting stuff that I can use / act on / make decisions with or just plain talk about to others. I should pick up one or two of these and see if I like them.
San Rafael, CA
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Rockstar says average work week under 46 hours

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"We will not stop working to improve in this area," says co-head of Red Dead Redemption 2 developer
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mxm23
56 days ago
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Wow. Averages lie. What’s the median?
San Rafael, CA
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Get whiter teeth after just one of these charcoal treatments

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Drop by just about any health store and you'll hear raves about charcoal's curious and newfound properties as a sponge for the body's toxins. Turns out its beauty benefits are just as miraculous. The NUOVAWHITE Charcoal Teeth Whitening System uses charcoal as the active ingredient for a treatment that will visibly make your pearlies pearlier after just one go.

NUOVAWHITE works with Blue LED Light technology and specially treated whitening charcoal to brighten your smile. And it doesn't just improve the looks: The treatments actually bolster and restore your existing tooth enamel in the process. It's the safest treatment around - FDA compliant, cruelty-free and even completely kosher.

If all this sounds good enough to double up, then grab the NUOVAWHITE Charcoal Teeth Whitening System: 2-Pack for $27.99 Read the rest

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mxm23
68 days ago
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Sounds like something Gwyneth Paltrow would sell.
San Rafael, CA
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